St. Leonard, Clent ©  Do you not know? Have you not heard? The LORD is the everlasting God.  (Isaiah 40. v.28)

Clent Church - as it used to be

“The   church   of    ST.   LEONARD    consists   of   a chancel   23   ft.   by   15   ft.,   with   an   organ chamber   on   the   north,   a   nave   46   ft.   by 15   ft.,   north   and   south   aisles,   the   latter 12   ft.   wide,   a   west   tower   11   ft.   by   10½ ft.,   the   ground   floor   of   which   is   used   as a    vestry,    and    a    south    porch.    These measurements are all internal. The      12th-century      church      probably consisted   of   a   chancel   and   nave   only,   to which    a    south    aisle    was    added    about 1170.    There    is    no    evidence    of    further structural    alterations    until    early    in    the 15th   century,   when   the   tower   was   built and     the     south     aisle     widened,     the chancel      being      reconstructed      about 1440.    The    north    aisle    was    added    in 1837,   but   this,   together   with   the   nave, was    rebuilt    during    the    years    1864–5. The organ chamber and porch were erected at the same time. The    chancel    axis    inclines    to    the    south.    In    the    east    wall    is    an    original    traceried window    of    five    lights,    with    a    segmental-pointed    head    ribbed    on    the    inside    and ornamented   at   the   apex   with   a   small   carved   angel   holding   what   appears   to   be   a paten.   The   external   hood   is   finished   with   a   finial.   In   the   west   end   of   the   north   wall   a modern   arch   opens   into   the   organ   chamber.   The   chancel   is   lit   from   the   south   by   two square-headed   two-light   windows,   the   inner   jambs   of   which   are   splayed   below,   but shouldered    at    the    head.    Under    the    sill    of    the    easternmost    is    an    ogee-headed piscina.   The   basin   appears   to   have   been   quatrefoiled,   but   has   been   broken   off   flush with   the   wall   face.   Between   the   windows   is   a   very   flat   ogee-headed   doorway   of   the same   date   as   the   chancel,   the   external   label   of   which   returns   on   itself.   Cut   on   the eastern   inner   jamb   is   a   black-letter   inscription   reading,   'Juxta   hunc   lapidem   jacet corpus    johannis    cleye.'    In    the    opposite    jamb    is    a    large    groove    cut    to    receive    a wooden   bar.   The   chancel   arch,   of   three   chamfered   orders,   is   15th-century   work.   The chancel   walls   are   built   of   sandstone   with   a   moulded   plinth,   stepped   to   the   fall   of   the ground   from   east   to   west,   and   diagonal   buttresses   at   the   east   end.   The   coping   of the   eastern   gable   is   finished,   at   the   apex,   with   a   crocketed   pinnacle   and   with   carved grotesques at the eaves. The   nave   arcades   are   in   three   bays.   That   on   the   north   is   entirely   modern,   but portions   of   12th-century   masonry   have   been   retained   in   the   southern.   The   pointed arches    of    two    square    orders    rest    on    circular    piers    with    scalloped    capitals    and moulded   bases   raised   on   square   plinths.   Parts   of   the   capitals   of   both   piers   are   old, and   a   few   stones   in   the   piers   and   arches   appear   to   have   been   re-used.   The   west respond,   with   the   exception   of   the   abacus,   is   original   12th-century   work.   The   two- light   east   window   in   the   south   aisle   is   contemporary   with   the   widening,   but   the tracery   and   mullions   have   been   restored.   At   the   east   end   of   the   south   wall   is   a   small piscina,   with   a   pointed   head   and   broken   bowl,   and   in   the   same   wall   are   two   15th- century   windows   of   two   lights   each.   The   pointed   south   door   between   them   has been   much   restored,   and   the   south   porch   is   modern.   Externally   the   walls   of   this aisle   have   a   double   chamfered   plinth,   with   a   diagonal   buttress   at   the   south-west angle and a second in a line with the east wall. The   tower,   divided   into   three   stages   by   moulded   strings,   has   an   embattled   parapet and   a   moulded   plinth,   with   diagonal   buttresses   at   the   angles.   In   the   south-west corner   is   a   small   vice.   The   tower   arch   is   pointed   and   of   two   orders,   the   outer continuous   but   the   inner   interrupted   by   a   moulded   cap.   The   south   wall   is   pierced   by a   modern   doorway,   but   the   three-light   traceried   west   window   is   original.   The   ringing stage   is   lit   from   the   north   and   south   by   a   single   square-headed   light,   and   in   each wall   of   the   bell-chamber   is   a   two-light   pointed   opening   of   the   early   15th   century. Projecting   from   each   face   of   the   tower   below   the   parapet   is   a   much-weathered gargoyle,   carved   in   the   form   of   a   grotesque   beast.   The   nave   roofs   are   modern,   but that   over   the   chancel   is   of   early   15th-century   date   and   of   the   trussed   rafter   type. Each   pair   of   rafters   is   trussed   by   a   collar   and   two   curved   braces,   which   spring   from the moulded wall-plates and form a series of semicircular arches. There    is    a    peal    of    eight    bells,    two    of    which    were    added    in    1902    by    Taylor    of Loughborough.   The   old   bells   are   inscribed   as   follows:   (1)   'M'   John   Waldron   de   Field, M r    W m    Cole,   Zeph   Creswell   1718';   (2)   'Cantate   Domino   Canticum   Novum.   1681';   (3) 'Henricus   Bagley   mee   fecit   1681';   (4)   'Henry   Bagley   made   me   1681';   (5)   'Henry   Bagley made   me   1681';   (6)   'John   Perry   vicar,   John   Cresswell   John   Waldron   Churchwardens, John   Amphlett   Esquire'   and   on   the   lip   of   the   bell   'John   Gopp,   Abraham   Hill,   Richard Wight,   Joseph   Waldron,   Thomas   Waldron,   Richard   Hill.   Richard   Bagley   made   mee 1743.' The   plate   consists   of   a   mid-16th-century   silver   cup   unstamped,   a   silver   salver   of 1693    inscribed    'Donum    Mariae    Amphlett    Ecclesiae    Clent    1750,'    a    modern    silver flagon of 1907, an electro-plated paten and an electro-plated flagon. The   registers   previous   to   1813   are   as   follows:   (i)   all   entries   1562   to   1619,   also   for year   1626;   (ii)   baptisms   1637   to   1642,   marriages   and   burials   1637   to   1641,   also   all 1654   to   1729;   (iii)   baptisms   1729   to   1775   (no   entries   for   1738),   also   for   year   1782, marriages   1729   to   1754,   burials   1729   to   1757,   for   the   year   1768,   1774   to   1776   and 1780   to   1782;   (iv)   baptisms   and   burials   1783   to   1812;   (v)   marriages   1754   to   1787;   (vi) marriages   1787   to   1798;   (vii)   marriages   1798   to   1812.   The   earlier   books   have   been handsomely bound.  
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St. Leonardís
© John 14:6   I am the way, the truth, and the life.

Clent Church - as it used to be

“The   church   of    ST.   LEONARD    consists of   a   chancel   23   ft.   by   15   ft.,   with   an organ   chamber   on   the   north,   a   nave 46    ft.    by    15    ft.,    north    and    south aisles,   the   latter   12   ft.   wide,   a   west tower   11   ft.   by   10½   ft.,   the   ground floor   of   which   is   used   as   a   vestry, and        a        south        porch.        These measurements are all internal. The    12th-century    church    probably consisted    of    a    chancel    and    nave only,    to    which    a    south    aisle    was added     about     1170.     There     is     no evidence       of       further       structural alterations    until    early    in    the    15th century,    when    the    tower    was    built and    the    south    aisle    widened,    the chancel   being   reconstructed   about   1440.   The   north   aisle   was   added   in   1837, but   this,   together   with   the   nave,   was   rebuilt   during   the   years   1864–5.   The organ chamber and porch were erected at the same time. The   chancel   axis   inclines   to   the   south.   In   the   east   wall   is   an   original   traceried window   of   five   lights,   with   a   segmental-pointed   head   ribbed   on   the   inside and    ornamented    at    the    apex    with    a    small    carved    angel    holding    what appears   to   be   a   paten.   The   external   hood   is   finished   with   a   finial.   In   the   west end   of   the   north   wall   a   modern   arch   opens   into   the   organ   chamber.   The chancel   is   lit   from   the   south   by   two   square-headed   two-light   windows,   the inner   jambs   of   which   are   splayed   below,   but   shouldered   at   the   head.   Under the   sill   of   the   easternmost   is   an   ogee-headed   piscina.   The   basin   appears   to have   been   quatrefoiled,   but   has   been   broken   off   flush   with   the   wall   face. Between   the   windows   is   a   very   flat   ogee-headed   doorway   of   the   same   date as   the   chancel,   the   external   label   of   which   returns   on   itself.   Cut   on   the eastern   inner   jamb   is   a   black-letter   inscription   reading,   'Juxta   hunc   lapidem jacet   corpus   johannis   cleye.'   In   the   opposite   jamb   is   a   large   groove   cut   to receive   a   wooden   bar.   The   chancel   arch,   of   three   chamfered   orders,   is   15th- century    work.    The    chancel    walls    are    built    of    sandstone    with    a    moulded plinth,   stepped   to   the   fall   of   the   ground   from   east   to   west,   and   diagonal buttresses   at   the   east   end.   The   coping   of   the   eastern   gable   is   finished,   at   the apex, with a crocketed pinnacle and with carved grotesques at the eaves. The   nave   arcades   are   in   three   bays.   That   on   the   north   is   entirely   modern, but   portions   of   12th-century   masonry   have   been   retained   in   the   southern. The   pointed   arches   of   two   square   orders   rest   on   circular   piers   with   scalloped capitals   and   moulded   bases   raised   on   square   plinths.   Parts   of   the   capitals   of both   piers   are   old,   and   a   few   stones   in   the   piers   and   arches   appear   to   have been   re-used.   The   west   respond,   with   the   exception   of   the   abacus,   is   original 12th-century     work.     The     two-light     east     window     in     the     south     aisle     is contemporary   with   the   widening,   but   the   tracery   and   mullions   have   been restored.   At   the   east   end   of   the   south   wall   is   a   small   piscina,   with   a   pointed head   and   broken   bowl,   and   in   the   same   wall   are   two   15th-century   windows of   two   lights   each.   The   pointed   south   door   between   them   has   been   much restored,   and   the   south   porch   is   modern.   Externally   the   walls   of   this   aisle have   a   double   chamfered   plinth,   with   a   diagonal   buttress   at   the   south-west angle and a second in a line with the east wall. The   tower,   divided   into   three   stages   by   moulded   strings,   has   an   embattled parapet   and   a   moulded   plinth,   with   diagonal   buttresses   at   the   angles.   In   the south-west   corner   is   a   small   vice.   The   tower   arch   is   pointed   and   of   two orders,   the   outer   continuous   but   the   inner   interrupted   by   a   moulded   cap. The   south   wall   is   pierced   by   a   modern   doorway,   but   the   three-light   traceried west   window   is   original.   The   ringing   stage   is   lit   from   the   north   and   south   by a   single   square-headed   light,   and   in   each   wall   of   the   bell-chamber   is   a   two- light   pointed   opening   of   the   early   15th   century.   Projecting   from   each   face   of the   tower   below   the   parapet   is   a   much-weathered   gargoyle,   carved   in   the form   of   a   grotesque   beast.   The   nave   roofs   are   modern,   but   that   over   the chancel   is   of   early   15th-century   date   and   of   the   trussed   rafter   type.   Each   pair of   rafters   is   trussed   by   a   collar   and   two   curved   braces,   which   spring   from   the moulded wall-plates and form a series of semicircular arches. There   is   a   peal   of   eight   bells,   two   of   which   were   added   in   1902   by   Taylor   of Loughborough.   The   old   bells   are   inscribed   as   follows:   (1)   'M'   John   Waldron de   Field,   M r    W m    Cole,   Zeph   Creswell   1718';   (2)   'Cantate   Domino   Canticum Novum.   1681';   (3)   'Henricus   Bagley   mee   fecit   1681';   (4)   'Henry   Bagley   made me    1681';    (5)    'Henry    Bagley    made    me    1681';    (6)    'John    Perry    vicar,    John Cresswell   John   Waldron   Churchwardens,   John   Amphlett   Esquire'   and   on   the lip   of   the   bell   'John   Gopp,   Abraham   Hill,   Richard   Wight,   Joseph   Waldron, Thomas Waldron, Richard Hill. Richard Bagley made mee 1743.' The    plate    consists    of    a    mid-16th-century    silver    cup    unstamped,    a    silver salver   of   1693   inscribed   'Donum   Mariae   Amphlett   Ecclesiae   Clent   1750,'   a modern   silver   flagon   of   1907,   an   electro-plated   paten   and   an   electro-plated flagon. The   registers   previous   to   1813   are   as   follows:   (i)   all   entries   1562   to   1619,   also for   year   1626;   (ii)   baptisms   1637   to   1642,   marriages   and   burials   1637   to 1641,   also   all   1654   to   1729;   (iii)   baptisms   1729   to   1775   (no   entries   for   1738), also   for   year   1782,   marriages   1729   to   1754,   burials   1729   to   1757,   for   the year   1768,   1774   to   1776   and   1780   to   1782;   (iv)   baptisms   and   burials   1783   to 1812;   (v)   marriages   1754   to   1787;   (vi)   marriages   1787   to   1798;   (vii)   marriages 1798 to 1812. The earlier books have been handsomely bound.  
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